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The 12 Euro Coat!

By Di, Oct 3 2017 02:09PM

During a recent trip to France I visited a Puce De Coutouries, rather like a craft fair, where the vendors sold fabric and other sewing related items rather than finished products. I bought quite a few pieces of fabric at 3 or 4 Euro a metre, even with the poor exchange rate they were still bargains.

I very nearly bought this miniture sewing machine to add to my collection, but I couldn't find a price! I was also neary tempted at a stall selling antique sewing tools!

The outside stalls included my favourite 'fabric man' who stands on a couple of our local markets. In addition to his stall his van is always packed with fabric which he's happy for me to root through. My sort of fabric shoppping!


I bought the end of a bolt of reversible wool for 12 Euro. I was reassured that this is ex Lacoste. It's two layers of knitted fabric bonded together, with a bit of stretch, but not enough to make comfortable day wear. I initially thought about a completely reversible garment where the seams allowances are hidden by pulling the two layers apart before stitching one layer, pressing and hand stitching the other layer closed. However I couldn't seperate the layers!


I hadn't intended to make a coat for this winter, but couldn't resist pulling out a favourite pattern I've made a few times before.

McCalls 5062 has set in sleeves and quite curved princess seams that I didn't feel would work well with my idea for exposed seams. I searched through my patterns and found Butterick 6030 that had been free with Make it Today Dressmaker magazine. This had a shallower princess seam and raglan sleeves. I knew the McCall's pattern fitted well, so I used that for the basis of the design and altered the upper body and sleeves using the Butterick pattern.


This fabric doesn't fray so pressing the seams open and top stitching them was quite straight forward. The first problem I had to work out was the underarm seam. I'd already stitched the raglan sleeve to the bodice and to expose the sleeve seams I would have needed to stitch inside the tube, but the fabric isn't flexible enough for that. I stitched the seams traditionally, securing the end of the stitching. The bodice side seam was also stitched up to the underarm, exposing the seam allowances. To stengthen the underarm seam I added seam tape, before herringbone stitching the sleeve seam allowances.

I decided the fronts would be finished with raw edges. As the fabric had some stretch it needed two layers for stability. I machining round the edge and trimmed.

The sleeves are finished with mock cuffs.

The pockets are only a single layer with the flap secured by a button. I thought about using bound buttonholes, but felt they would be too bulky, so used corded buttonholes.

I have a feeling this coat is going to get loads of wear this winter and will work well with my self designed jeans.

I'll be posting some pictures on Instagram when I start to wear it!



5 comments
Oct 4 2017 02:28AM by Ruth Radke

I think your coat is beautiful. It reminds me of a Ralph Lauren pattern from the 70's. It was done in gray with lighter contrasting trim. This look is very chic.

Oct 4 2017 03:22PM by Karina @ Lovemade Handmade

I think your coat is quite beautiful! I love the color and the style lines. I have yet to make a coat myself, but I’m sure one day I will after seeing yours. You’ve totally inspired me!

Nov 9 2017 09:13AM by Laura

I cannot believe this was 12 Euro. I love how you used the fabric as a feature point. Tres chic.

Jan 13 2018 07:40PM by Anne

Enjoyed reading your blog. Your coat looks very classy. I will see if I can find your Instagram.

Jan 21 2018 10:29AM by diofheage

Thank you Anne. I've had this website ages and have only just discovered how to reply to comments!

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