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ZoZo Suit - A Useful tool for Home Garment Makers?

By Di, Dec 10 2018 05:11PM

Today I took the plung into motion capture, donning my ZOZO suit to allow my mobile phone to take my measurements!


I'm going to preface this review. ZOZO is a company primarily selling custom fit clothing, they're not a home garment making service. In order to offer their clothing range they need a consistent method of collecting their customers measurements.


https://zozo.com/gb/en


I decided to try out their measurement system to see if it will help me in choosing pattern sizes and making adjustments to make my own well fitting clothes. I'm already fairly well aware of my measurements and tend to use them to map my changing body shape more acuuratly than just weighing myself. For example; I already know that my right thigh is 1" bigger than my left.


It's really easy to get your free ZOZO suit by setting up an account and giving weight, height and gender information. Mine arrived in a couple of days in an interesting envelope that had my husband intreged as to what I was up to now!

The package contained the 2 piece body suit, more on that later, a dinky phone stand that I'm keeping for when I want to take a quick selfie

Also a basic guide about what to do next.

Once you have your suit you need to install the app on your phone. It costs£4.53 which didn't seem too much for this experiment into using technology.


You need a well lit, unclutterd space which took a bit of organising!.


The suit is a 2 piece made in a fine and very stretchy 68%polyester 32%spandex with white dots that need to be horizontal when worn.

I'd have liked more information about the measuring process before launching the app, however the app was really easy to use. I'm never sure with technology about whats going to happen when I press NEXT! In fact the app takes you through how to position your phone, the correct way to wear the suit, how to stand and uses a clock face to help you understand how to rotate whilst the app takes 12 pictures.


Your phone needs to be about 6' away and approx 30" off the floor, which is the height of most tables. The app actually tells you what to do and there's a simple volume test which asks you to type a number that you hear. This was my first problem as I'd linked my bluetooth shutter and I couldn't type the number. Once I realised the bluetooth wasn't necessary the app's own keyboard popped up.


You're instructed to put your phone on the stand. This took a few attempts as the screen kept minimising so I didn't get the instructions! It took a few attempts to get this to work, but once we got going it was really simple. The instructions tell you if you're the right distance from the camera and gives instructions to move forwards or backwards. There's audible bleeps at each stage and instructions to tell you when to turn to each point on an imaginary clock. The measurements are calculated really quickly and you've already agreed for the company to store your data.

This is my own picture, not something generated in the app. I find it interesting as it clearly shows that my right shoulder drops slightly causing bunching between my armhole and waist, also my right thigh near the hip is more rounded than the left. These were things I was already aware of, but for many people this image of their own might prove really useful. You can take this pic with just the suit that's free....


How Accurate are the Measurements?

I took a screen capture of my measurements as I wasn't sure if this was something I'd find in my account. Actually it's really easy to find your stored measurements as a picture and in a chart.


The thing that jumps out at me is the differrences between right and left sides. I already knew about my right thigh being significantly larger than my left, it's really important when I make trousers. However there's a difference for all my horizontal measurements. I'm right side dominant so perhaps it shouldn't be a surprise, but important to know which side is largest. It doesn't mean I need to make sleeves different sizes, but they must be made to fit the largest measurement with enough ease to fit comfortably..


Once I compared the measurements against the ones I take there isn't a significant difference in most of them, especially as i've always been taught a tape measure shouldn't be pulled tight..


However:

There are 2 waist measurements, upper and lower, neither have any similarity to my waist measurement. The upper waist is accurate for my bra band measurement, just below my bust. The lower waist is accurate for my high hip, level with the top of the hip bones, Neither are much use for clothes I want to fit my waist!

The outer arm length is a bit unclear as one side shows a line to the neck and the other to the shoulder. Once I checked my arm length I suggest this measuremeant is from the shoulder point to the wrist, but for me they come out a bit too long.

The inside leg measurement is also really short, for me it could be 2"!

Conclusion

Can you tell I was a teacher..... conclusion is such a tell tale sign!


I have one major misgiving about this app and the information it provides. There are no vertical measurements that tell us the distance between bust, waist and hips. It presumes we are all the same height and proportion. Many women need to alter the bust height on patterns so the fullest area falls in the right place.

When altering patterns the first thing to do is to get the back neck, waist and hip levels the correct distance apart. Then making sure the bust point is the correct distance from the neck/shoulder point. Once these are accurate it's time to alter the wdith measurements as now they're going to be the right distance apart to match your body.


It's been an interesting exercise, but not sure it's told me anything I didn't already know. However; for those newer to making your own clothes it could be a really useful tool as long as you accept the importance of getting your vertical measurements right first.

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